Surroundings

The most visited tourist attractions in South Iceland are near by. Among them are Gullfoss, Geysir, Thingvellir, Laugavatn, Hekla together with Eyjafjallajokull. Other places of interest and connected to South Iceland are; Thorsmörk, Westman Islands, Jokulsarlon and many more. Gourmet restaurants are placed in Selfoss and near by.The Northern lights (aurora borealis) may appear in South Iceland any time late autumn..
The name Þingvellir is derived from the Old Norse Þingvollr, from þing (“thing, assembly”) and vollr (“field”), meaning assembly fields. Compare the English thing and weald(“Thingweald”) from Anglo-Saxon þing and weald. The site takes its name from Alþing (Althing), the national parliament of Iceland, which was founded at Þingvellir in 930 and held its sessions there until 1798. A thing was a form of governing assembly found in Germanic societies, and a tradition that endures to this day in one form or another across Northern Europe. Although the name Þingvellir is plural, the older form Þingvollr is singular, and the modern singular form Þingvöllur can still be heard. The name is anglicised as Thingvellir, and might appear as Tingvellir, Thingvalla or Tingvalla in other languages. The spelling Pingvellir is incorrect: as the letter “p” should never be used to represent the letter “þ” (thorn), which is pronounced as “th” is in English. Dingwall and Tingwall in Scotland, Thingwall in England, Tynwald on the Isle of Man, and Tingvoll in Norway bear names of the same root and meaning.
Seljalandsfoss is a waterfall in Iceland. Seljalandsfoss is located in the South Region in Iceland right by Route 1 and the road that leads to Þórsmörk Road 249. The waterfall drops 60 m (197 ft) and is part of the Seljalands River that has its origin in the volcano glacier Eyjafjallajökull. Visitors can walk behind the falls into a small cave Although the name Þingvellir is plural, the older form Þingvollr is singular, and the modern singular form Þingvöllur can still be heard. The name is anglicised as Thingvellir, and might appear as Tingvellir, Thingvalla or Tingvalla in other languages. The spelling Pingvellir is incorrect: as the letter “p” should never be used to represent the letter “þ” (thorn), which is pronounced as “th” is in English. Dingwall and Tingwall in Scotland, Thingwall in England, Tynwald on the Isle of Man, and Tingvoll in Norway bear names of the same root and meaning.